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isn't quite ashamed enough to present

jr conlin's ink stained banana

:: Travel Advise

At work, someone said they were visiting California this upcoming summer for a couple of weeks and wanted to know if there were any recommendations for places to visit.

i offered the following:

There’s lots to do and see in California, but you have to remember that it’s a big state. (it takes around 13 hours to drive from the top to bottom, on freeways, so it’s not really the best way to see it.) i note this because it’s actually worth considering California as several different states loosely bound by asphalt.

True “Northern California” (generally everything north of Santa Rosa) is mostly deep wood areas. That’s where you get some really stunning drives through massive redwood forests and along coastlines. i’ve done route 1 from Mendocino to Eureka. It’s really pretty, but probably not the best with a car full of kids. It can also be more than a bit redneck.

East across the 5 is Shasta, Lassen and Plumas. These are also pretty, but less wooded. They are the remains of part of the volcano chain that stretches up the rest of the coast. Again, great if you love hiking, not so great if you’re into family fun activities.

Heading south a bit you get to what most would consider “Northern California” (which is about mid-way down the state). Basically it’s the Wine valleys (Russian River, Napa & Sonoma) east to about Sacramento, and south to Monterey. Lots and lots of stuff to do around here. Depending on what you want, you can spend days in SF and San Jose, visit Old Town and the train museum in Sacramento. Take advantage of your kids driving skills in the Wine Valleys, or spend the day at the Santa Cruz board walk, or just hit up Atlas Obscura for places like the Musée Mécanique)

Headed further south on 1 (you’ll recognize it for being in every car commercial, ever) gets you to the Central Coast, so named because even Californian’s have no idea how big their state really is. That gets you Pismo Beach and San Luis Obispo (SLO). One noted for being Bugs Bunny’s vacation destination of choice, the other for being a college town with a fairly nice downtown. Again, wineries abound around there, and if you’re feeling like ignoring your car rentals strict rules, there’s beach driving at the Dunes. Or there’s also Dinosaur Caves Park, named after a tourist attraction that featured most of a dinosaur that eventually fell into the sea. Darn pretty park, though.

If you’re particularly lucky, and or the weather holds out, you might even be able to see a rocket launch from Vandenburg in Lompoc. (Bonus points if you insist on saying that town’s name like the narrator in Roger Ramjet, but only because it annoys my wife.) Continuing south gets you to Santa Barbara which is notable for it’s beach, ritzy shopping area, and the birthplace of a number of burger joints.

It’s also about where Southern California starts. Personally, i love taking 101 along this stretch since it hugs the coast. Right now, however, there’s also the problem of burn areas and mud slides, but that’s because we insist on putting roads next to mountains that catch fire.

Then comes LA. You could spend years going over all the stuff in LA and still not see it all. Instead feel free to drive through Anaheim past all the theme parks and watch your kids understand the glory of disappointment. Or just go by Knotts Berry Farm and let them wonder why the company that makes half of their peanut butter sandwiches has some deal promoting a 70 year old cartoon character using roller-coasters.

Finally, roll down 5 past the largest military base in the country, and you’ll arrive in San Diego. An old Spanish town which translates roughly into “Base Entrance next 5 exits”. Downtown San Diego does have some really good restaurants, a surprisingly good Little Italy and lots of folks from LA getting away for the weekend.

i didn’t even note some of the eastern stuff like the Salton Sea (which is a weird monument to a devastating irrigation error, the remains of Josuha Tree National Park & Death Valley.

Likewise, there’s Yosemite, with it’s grand vistas and magnificent traffic, and Lake Tahoe, which will probably make you realize you really can’t take too many pictures.

i think that should probably do it. Granted, by this point you’ll probably be enjoying retirement. Your kids retirement, but retirement none the less. Hope that helps!

:: Ununifi’d

i have a server in my garage. It’s not a super beefy machine, but i use it as a NAS, postgres/http server and a few other things. i’ve had it for a while and while i wouldn’t say it’s a key element of my home network, it’s damn handy to keep around. Still, it’s not quite worth fishing a 30m of cat6 line through a 60 year old house, so i use wifi to connect to it.

the unifi access pointBecause i tend to be a fairly cheap bastard, i’ll get a sub $100 access point in whatever the fastest flavor of 802.11 happens to be at the time. The problem with doing that is sometimes, say, when you’re on vacation in LA for a week, the crappy access point dies on you and your wife can’t peek at the out the front window while she’s away. So after coming home and turning the access point on and off again, i decided i’d fix the problem for realz and get an Unifi AP AC Lite. Several colleagues have Unifi setups for their homes and swear that they’re the bees knees. (i’ll get into that a bit more later.)

Yeah, i’m not so sure about that anymore.

Now, let me make a brief aside to discuss my home network.

i consider the modem provided to me to be hostile. It’s from AT&T, so that’s probably all you need to know. Since it runs a network on 192.168.1.0/24, i keep my protected network on 192.168.2.0/24 behind a second router. Further more, i keep two “private” wifi nets and one “guest” net that gets no access to the private network. i also run a Pi-Hole as my local network DNS. ABSOLUTELY NONE OF THAT SHOULD MATTER TO ANY GOOD ACCESS POINT

Normally, when i get a new access point, i simply plug it into the protected net’s hub, open up the admin access HTTP page, do a bit of local configuration for the device, and we’re good to go, super easy-peasy.

This is not the case with Unifi.

Unifi first wants… no, let me clarify… demands you download their java based controller app. This sets up a local connection running on port “8443” (Oh, hey, that’s the HTTPS port! Better hope you don’t run a secure server on whatever machine you’re running this app on because otherwise you’re going to be very sad.). Of course, the Controller app doesn’t provide any config options to change the port or really do anything other than open a browser to connect, which i guess is fine.

Ok, so let me connect up the access point. i grab a few extra cat5 cables (because none were in the box), and pass the connection through the PoE connector running on a 12″ power cord. i was told that as a device comes online it would appear in the Controller listing. This, appears not to be true.

i unplug, and replug, checking connections. Nope.
i open my protected router’s config panel and see the new Unifi device’s IP4 address. Still nothing in the controller.
i ping the access point, Nothing in the controller.
i port scan the access point, oh, port 22 is open. Google says the user and password is “ubnt” (yay! Security!) and yep, that works just fine. Still nothing in the controller app, though.
i use the “device discovery” tool, which eventually finds the device and lets me locate it. Absolutely zilch in the controller app.

Out of pure curiosity and a bit of needling from a colleague, i connect my computer directly to the AP. Hey! There it is! Only i can’t adopt it because who the hell knows why?

Ok, this is just stupid. Screw you, “controller” app that’s probably doing some UDP polling crap to be clever, let me just ssh back onto the device and… oh, swell. It’s running some weird deviant of Unix. No /etc/network, no /etc/wpa_supplicant,…

There is a /var/log/message that i can cat, and see that it’s constantly trying to connect to “http://unifi:8080/inform”. Well, that’s less than helpful, since i don’t have a “unifi” on my net. Let me force it to connect to my host box that’s running the Connector app… Yay! It connected! and failed to adopt and is back looking for “http://unifi:8080/inform”…

Yeah, ok, i’m done.

i have no doubt that these are amazing in enterprise configurations. i’m sure that if you buy enough Unifi gear, that things “just work” kind of like how you need to buy all of Apple’s stuff for all of Apple’s stuff to work together magically. (i consider this “tech tautology”.) i’m also reminded of one colleague noting that he was able to “adopt” unifi gear that was being installed into neighbor’s houses, so guessing that things work REALLY WELL if you’re doing your initial setup in a Faraday cage, or with no questionable parties sitting within 230 feet of you.

But for me? yeah, no. This thing’s going back.

As for my crappy current access point that drops on occasion? i can solve that for about $25.

:: Best of Twitter

Recently, i grabbed my twitter data, mostly because i could. Reading through it, i kinda remembered how ephemeral it all is. So, again because i can, allow me to indulge myself with what i think are the best tweets i came up with (there aren’t many).

:: ev-iDunno….

tl;dr: Electric cars are nice toys that are not quite practical enough for me.

i drive a 12 year old Outback that has about 96,000 miles on it. This makes it “low mileage” and i like to think i keep it in pretty good shape. Even though it’s a Subaru and the life span on those things is amazing, it’s still a pretty good idea to look around at car options every decade or so.

While considering a more modern vehicle, there are three key items i consider kinda required at this point:

  1. Back up camera. It’s kind of a stupid thing, and i know how to set my mirrors and all, but i’ve driven cars with the camera and damn if it’s not useful.
  2. Crash avoidance. This can either be lane assist or city crash avoidance, but in any case, i’d like the car to be able to spot things i don’t. i’ve not had that as a problem, yet, but if there are going to be cameras on the car already, seems like a good follow up.
  3. Integrated Smart Phone environment Car UIs suck, the built in navigation systems are terrible, and they’ll never update as often as the pocket computer i haul around everywhere. It’s just bad design for auto makers not to include Android Auto or whatever iPhones do.

Recently, i got a hair about getting an electric. While i’m ok with reducing my carbon footprint, it also seems like a reasonable thing to do since there’s less parts to go horribly wrong. Since i don’t make enough to impulse buy a car, i wanted to do a fair bit of research on whatever the hell i’m dropping potentially half a years salary on. (i know, silly me. Not really into the California Mansion1 idea.) Still, doing the research kinda shows that things are not quite ready.

The first thing that kinda surprised me was the power problem. i’m not talking about range, since cars like Tesla and Chevy make cars that can do 200+ miles on a full battery, i’m talking more about what to do after you’ve driven 200+ miles. Turns out, that can be a tricky question.

Let’s say that you decide to drive your brand new electric from San Jose to Pismo Beach. It’s a trip of about 200 miles down 101, so you’re probably going to need to power up. Ok, so where do you do that?

There’s no real standardization for the sort of power socket a car maker picks, so there’s about five different types. From what i’ve read, there’s the Tesla plug, “J Plug” J1772 and the J1772-Combo (for fast chargers) and the CHAdeMO. Tesla plugs pretty much are only for Teslas, CHAdeMO plugs are pretty much only for Nissan Leafs, and the J1772 type plugs are for most of the rest. i’m also going to bet that the charging protocols are wildly different between each of those. You can buy an adapters for most of these plugs, apparently.

Those paying attention may note that i said five plugs. The fifth type of plug is the only plug that’s US standard for all vehicles. It’s a 220v 20Amp Nema 5-20, like what you’d plug an electric dryer into.

i’ve been told that some charging station outlets also sport a Nema 6-50, which is a 240Volt/50Amp instead of a 120V/20A circuit. That would speed things along a good deal.

It’s also the slowest option and requires you to haul around whatever charging dongle you got with your car. If you left your power dongle at home, you can get another one send to you for around $350.

You can also get conversion dongles for most of these outlets, so in theory you’d have something for any situation. Not super ideal, but workable at least.

Of course, each of those plugs carries different charging times. If you have all day (literally, and then add a few hours) you can fully recharge using a Nema 5-20 in something like 30+ hours. A Nema 6-50 in about 10 hours. Whatever Level2 option you’re using will recharge you in about 8 hours, and the “fast charge” will get you back on the road in 4. That is, provided someone else isn’t already plugged into the one fast charger already. i’ll note that it’s $.10 a minute, so figure spending $18 for a full charge. Not terrible. It cost about that much to fill up my Mom’s Prius after driving it from Leesburg, Va to Fenwick Island, DE and back.

So, probably not a good Road Trip car. Granted, driving from San Jose to see my brother is about 120 miles, so charging would still be A Good Idea, and i can hope a pleasant 2 mile walk from the charging depot to where he lives.

That’s fine, it’s more for driving short trips in city traffic.

For that, i’ll admit that things would be a bit better. It’d be my commuter in the winter when i can’t really ride my bike to work or once every other week or so to charge it up at work. My company pays for the power for that (they’ve very nice) but it does also raise an interesting question. San Jose has a lot of charging stations. Not all work, or are available all the time, and as i noted, they’re best if you’re somewhere you don’t mind being for an hour or so. i can charge at home, if i’m willing to either install a charging station for $1000 (provided it has the right plug). Of course, i normally park my car out in my driveway. My garage is also my laundry room so the other car sits on the opposite side of the garage.

Still, not terrible, but what iced things was actually driving one. i test drove a Chevy Bolt for a few reasons. i’ve no real interest in trying a Tesla. i expect there to be some differences, but from what i experienced, i don’t think they really matter.

Pros:

  • One pedal driving was kind of nice and surprisingly intuitive. Mind you, i tend to drive like that already. i’m reasonably good at putting space between myself and the car ahead of me so i don’t really use my brake all that often. This just kinda felt like the next step.
  • The car was nice and zippy. i’d have no problem merging into traffic on busier streets, even if my battery life would have other opinions about that.
  • It had all three of the things i was looking for.

Cons:

  • Not really super comfy. This was a weird one. i get that the seats aren’t automatic for weight reasons, but they also didn’t really seem particularly well padded. They kinda felt like office chairs. This was particularly notable in the back seat. i will say that there was plenty of headroom and the interior felt “spacious” enough, but i’d expect that with a vehicle that’s front wheel drive.
  • The “hand brake” gimmick is as counter intuitive as the one pedal is intuitive. The pedal feels like it has higher braking “resolution” than the paddle button. When i tried pressing the button it felt like it would start slowing, then aggressively brake the longer i held it, regardless of what pressure i used. i’d feel sorry for any passengers that either were, or were about to be carsick.
  • Slow final braking. This was also odd to me. i get regen braking, but the final bit of brake felt like i really had to press down to get it to engage. Considering how much the vehicle wanted to capture momentum, that last bit struck me as odd. Using one pedal, i didn’t have that problem, but i could also see where i really don’t want to get used to the way that car handles. i’d pretty much ruin the other car.
  • The power reasons above.

So, where does that leave me?

Electric cars are nice, but i can’t shake the feeling that they’re still very much toys. Damn pricey toys, but toys. i kid around that i’ve already got an electric vehicle, and that’s proving to be more true than i’d prefer. If i had to get a vehicle right now and was only going to be using it around town, i’d consider an electric. For a while at least. It’ll be interesting to me to see how poorly this post ages.

i still really wish that Subaru made a hybrid, but that’s probably not going to happen for a while. Looks like they feature the auto engine start/stop at least.

1 A California Mansion is a really expensive car you drive around because there’s no hope at all at affording even a burned down house.

:: Dear Graduates of the School I Will Never Give a Commencement Speech to

You, full of youth and vigor, with stars in your eyes and a cause in your hearts, are ready to change the world. i wish you the absolute best, and in many respects, you will absolutely change the world.

Just realize, that about half of you are assholes.

i’m not saying you are, since i don’t know you well enough to make that determination. Nor am i declaring any group of you are assholes, much for the same reason. Hell, every one of you in this auditorium/stadium/state could not be an asshole, nor ever be. That still means half of your peers are, because there’s a lot of you and y’all are everywhere.

i know this because i was horrified to discover that half of my generation were assholes. Same with every generation back to the time when two fish fought to get out of a pile of muck. For some generations, more than half were assholes, for others, less than half, but rest assured, the number is about half.

What’s worse is that the asshole half are fairly well organized. Because they’re organized, they’re influential. Because they’re influential, they tend to get their way. Once they get their way, they do everything they possibly can to keep it that way. Why do they do this? Because they’re assholes.

Fret not, they consider you assholes because you don’t doggedly share their beliefs without question. You ask too many questions they don’t want answers to. Even worse, you support those other groups. How the hell could you possibly do that, you asshole?

i’m telling this to you now so that later, when you realize that all the things you though would happen don’t, or that there was no way could happen do, you’ll understand. Stupid wars will be fought, and gleefully supported by assholes. Assholes will prevent us from intervening in horrible injustices. Assholes will vote in other assholes and those assholes will push for policies that clearly favor assholes.

All this will leave you wondering where the hell all these assholes came from. Truth be told, they were always here. Some are born assholes, some trained to be assholes, some even make the choice to be an asshole and work at it at every opportunity.

You are going to be surrounded by assholes. You’re going to be saddened by them, infuriated by them, and you’re going to want to get revenge against assholes.

Yeah, don’t do that last thing.

Instead, understand that some people are just assholes. There may be a good reason, and you should at least make an attempt to understand what that reason can be, but ultimately, the reason they’re an asshole is because they’re an asshole, and that’s probably not going to change.

Instead, focus on the fact that assholes survive because you’re not doing stuff against them. Have plans. Sometimes, defeating assholes means doing things that you may not like, or make you think you’re an asshole. Sometimes, you might even have to be an asshole to someone in order to not be an asshole to a larger group, or to stop them from being an asshole. Work together with others who oppose the assholes. Assholes hate that and will fight you about it. That’s ok, you should expect them to be assholes about it.

It’s also important to understand why you’re being an asshole to someone (since, after all, half of you are assholes). There’s nothing special that makes an asshole an asshole. Anyone can be an asshole, just like how anyone can not be an asshole. What makes an asshole an asshole is when they’re an asshole. When they’re being selfish, close-minded, greedy, dismissive, demanding, those are all pretty clear markings of an asshole. Heck, we’ve had at least a dozen religions that point that out. (The assholes tend to ignore those parts, though.)

i wish i could give you better advice. i wish i could tell you how to solve the fact that half of you are assholes. i can’t. Perhaps one of you can. Instead, i’ll leave you with a few rules i’ve found for myself.

Take care of others.
Listen more than talk.
Reflect on where you are and how you got there and why someone else isn’t.
Realize that most folks aren’t really comfortable where they are.
Help when you can.
Don’t look back with regret. At the time it was the best decision you could make. Instead learn from it for the next time.
If you have power, use it for others more than yourself.
Realize, even those with power, fame and glory, could still use an extra napkin or help finding the bathroom.
Leave it slightly better than you found it.
Realize you’re not always right and that even someone you might look down on has something to teach.
Everyone has a hard job, and no one is solely defined by what they get paid to do.
Nobody has all the knowledge or answers.
Be respectful and kind.
Pick up your trash and hold the door open.
A few have it better, many have it worse. Just like we can use some help, so can others.
Don’t be afraid to ask for help, directions, or just to say “hello”.
Your brain regularly lies to you, and your head is full of assholes.
Other cultures aren’t better or worse, they just have different ideas, and only about half of them are assholes.

But most importantly, try not to be an asshole.

Blogs of note
personal Christopher Conlin USMC memoirs of hydrogen guy rhapsodic.org Henriette's Herbal Blog
geek ultramookie

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