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isn't quite ashamed enough to present

jr conlin's ink stained banana

:: Stepping Up

So, a bit of personal news. i got promoted.

i’m happy about that, and i expect that little will actually change, since i’ve been doing the stuff at this level for a while, but i did want to underscore a few things i learned.

1) Your manager is your ally (or foe).
My current manager is amazing. People management is an art and a skill that not everyone has. It is more than just juggling tasks and filling out paperwork. There’s a lot of other skills that good managers have including marketing (basically, promotions are making a marketing plea on behalf of their reports), mentoring, coaching, and dozens of other “soft” skills you don’t just magically get when you have people assigned to you.

This was absolutely highlighted to me when i read his promotion proposal letter. Not only did it make a concise case built off of what i had been doing, but it included anonymous “pull quotes” that he had collected from peers and team members. It also included a critique section that, summed up the reasons in two pages of well balanced advice for how i can improve.

2) Promotions are proactively retroactive.
There’s a statement in the company’s Leveling Guidance document that basically says “You’re not promoted for past work, you’re promoted for work you’re going to be doing.” i can’t help but smile a bit at that because there’s a built in contradiction.

You’re not going to be given new responsibility unless you’ve demonstrated you’re responsible. Your prior work absolutely sets the stage for any promotion you’re going to get, and that’s why i spent the past eight months or so working on demonstrating the stuff i can do. i kept a record of the tasks i did. i spoke up more. i made sure that others had a clear path to do more. It wasn’t hard for me to do any of that, because it’s what i normally do, but i made sure that i wasn’t as quiet about it.

Granted, that part i hated, and i may back off the drum beat a wee bit for a while.

Still, the one driving thing is that other people have clearly failed to develop the sort of mind-reading omniscience that i also lack and making sure that folks find out about things turns out to be a good idea. Who’da thunk?

3) Timing
i’ll admit, i’m also taking advantage of some interesting timing that is clearly in my favor. Right now, the company i work for is very concerned about attrition. With tech, folks tend to change jobs fairly frequently, and with the pandemic and general burnout, that churn is a good deal higher than normal. So, folks at the top are very interested in keeping folk. i have some fairly big cards to play, and i absolutely played them this round. Had the market be flush with folk wanting to work here or had the company been struggling financially, i would have lost my shot and had to try again in a few years.

4) Improve the ladder
One of the things that drives me nuts is when i see someone “pull up the ladder behind them”. They do stuff to get ahead, then once they’re in a position of more authority, they sabotage others from following them. i have no idea why they do this because real success comes when you do the opposite.

Think of it this way: If more people succeed, the team (and company) succeed, right? That means that there’s more resources available, and the company is going to invest those resource where there’s clear success. If you’re the person that’s seen as the success facilitator, why wouldn’t you be considered key?

Should i have done a lot of this work earlier? Yes. i was under the assumption that “If you keep your head down and do good work you’ll be rewarded.” That’s not strictly true. You probably won’t get fired or laid off. You might get a bonus or two, but anything longer termed requires effort and focus on your part.

:: Well, It Compiles…

Ah, the Holiday Season. A time to relax, unwind, and most importantly DON’T SHIP ANY CHANGES.

Recently, i had the pleasure of telling this story from my past to a junior (in age, not skill) dev on my team, and figured i’d share it here. So sidle up to the fire and grab a warm beverage, because it’s…


Story Time with JR

Many decades ago, i worked for a company that was building a program for Windows that did stuff on the Internet. Mind you, this was for Windows 3.0. Before Windows for Workgroups 3.1 that had TCP/IP drivers built in (we didn’t know that was on the roadmap either). As part of my job, i was working with a separate contractor that we hired to do the TCP/IP driver.

Let me set the stage even more. In those days, kids, you had to buy a separate networking card for your computer that cost hundreds of dollars and had to match whatever local networking protocol that you used. (Ah the days of coaxial runs, tokenrings, and vampire connectors. shudders), so we had specified a very specific configuration as part of the contract.

Since this was long before the days of reliable internets and nobody in the office wanted to run a BBS for this, i would get a disk in the mail (like an animal). i’d go to the test rig, install the driver (i laugh at your .msi configs), reboot, and…
Crash!!

As in Hard Crash / Blue Screen of Death at boot / Do not pass Go! Do not collect $200 kinda crash.

Ok, not great, but understandable because this was in the bear skins and pointy sticks period of personal networking, so maybe the card was wrong or the system was slightly off. i added a confirmation list for the hardware in the test rig, dug in to things as much as i could with a debugger, flagged the things i think are wrong, and mailed the package back.

Time marches on, a new week and a new disk arrives. They confirmed the build configuration, and it all looked good, so i reinstalled Windows, installed the new driver, and.. boom. Again, instant crash on boot. i debugged again, wrote up the report and into the mail it went.

Third week and again, no joy.

At this point, i was noticing a pattern.

So i called them.

“Hi, i got the latest version and it’s still crashing on boot.”
“Oh, huh. That’s odd. It’s based on a BSD TCP driver we know works fine. We just ported it to Windows.”
“Yeah, that is odd. Does it crash like this on your machine?”
“i don’t know.”
“You don’t know?”
“Yeah, we never tried running it.”
“You never… how do you know it works?”
“Well, it compiles.”

Later that day i began a surprise journey into learning Windows Device Drivers and TCP/IP networking as my boss cancelled the contract.


So, with that, i want to remind you all that just because your package/application builds, doesn’t mean that someone else’s will. Be kind this holiday season and let other folks have a restful break before the New Year begins.

Don’t release, it can wait ’til January.

:: 19 years

According to my own records, i’ve been running this blog for 19 years now.

Well, 20 if you think that the new millennium started on January 1st 2000.

According to the same indicator, i’ve published over 5500 posts.

i *could* make a comment here about this blog predating “web 2” and facing all the same challenges that face whoever wants to do any “web 3” thing (and probably as successful about it), but that would probably be snarky of me. Suffice to say, that you’ll see that not much has changed here, nor am i really planning on changing things in the future.

Japanese phone-booth green color scheme and all.

:: A Few Degrees out of 360

Every year (or twice a year) i’m reminded that most of the employee review process was created by folks that are not introverts.

This is highlighted by things like 360 Reviews, where you’re asked to provide feedback on lots of folk, like peers, and managers, and co-workers, and strangers. For introverts, this is kind of the worst case thing they can be asked to do. It’s not only forced social interaction, it’s forced social interaction that will impact your livelihood and whatever tenuous co-working relationships you may have managed to foster. Pile on to that the fact that folks have MASSIVE imposter syndrome and it’s just the worst time.

This is not to say that i don’t understand the value of this process. Managers are busy people who have enough on their plate that they often can’t assess a subordinate’s skills correctly. Likewise, relying on the viewpoint of a single individual means that there can be things missed. Well rounded feedback is invaluable in that it’s the outside perspective that we may be missing. i don’t know when i am screwing up for reals partly because i’m convinced i’m constantly screwing up, so having someone else give good critique about it is, well, critical.

Of course, my paranoid brain also notes that giving negative feedback, particularly around review time, and in a channel that is used by management, means that management has lots of ammo available to shoot down reasons that you might get a raise / promotion / recognition / whatever. “Well, Bob, i see here that you resolved seven critical security issues and single handedly kept this pillar system operational, but Dave thinks you need to write better comments, so here’s a ${CURRENT_BASE_INFLATION_RATE – 1}%1 bump in salary. We’ll see what we can do about that comment issue next quarter, right?”

Added into the fun, folks are often asked to list all the people they worked with over the prior period. For introverts, this is going to be a small number. Maybe three or four if they’re feeling super social one week. It may be the folk that review their code, or folk that they might have talked about a project with, or just folk that they have a reasonable level of trust in. Which the other person may not realize. Thus the whole “from strangers” thing above.

Getting back to the top point, i get the feeling that whoever tends to design these things presumes that everyone has a rich network of connections and believes that all interactions are done in good faith. i understand that it’s impossible to address each and every persons broken psyche, but i do wonder if there might be a better way to approach this for folks that are not, let’s say, outgoing in the workplace.

Maybe ask them to put together a list of the folks they felt were meaningful (either good or bad) to them over the past few months. Maybe get in an introvert whisperer who will chat with folks to ask what about that person was meaningful and help craft a statement that the introvert can agree with. Point out that there might be things that the other person could do differently that might make working with them easier or things they do now that shouldn’t change.

People often say that introverts are socially awkward, but i’d argue that it’s because they’re hyper aware of social interaction. They are well, well aware of the weight that actions can take and they don’t want to cause undo damage. These sorts of requests are difficult to deal with because introverts are keenly aware of the sorts of outcomes they carry. For them, there’s no way to do this in a “light, casual” manner. They’re dealing with someone’s life and don’t want their misjudgement to be what ruins it.

Of course, i’m not a behavioral scientist, psychologist, or extrovert (regardless of how i may act), so Far Smarter People than i should probably work on this. i also wonder if it might be good if companies at least recognize this as a source of potential stress and at least give employees ways to either address, or help address it in their own ranks.

If not, folks are welcome to join me twice a year as i stare out into the endless sea surrounded by a dark cloud of anxiety and dread.


1 This is a pay cut.

:: Web 3. No

Recently i heard about Web 3.0.

Ok, not that recently, but like all such things, it bubbled up enough that i finally decided to pay some attention to it. Mostly based on this thread touting the glory that would be Web 3.0

Web 3.0 is a bit… i’m going to say nebulously… defined. The shortest answer is some hand waving about using blockchain to ensure that content remains distributed and not centralized like it is with Web 2.0. (Yeah, i know. Granted, i had thought that Web 2.0 was where every site had an API and you could use data however you wanted, and THAT got replaced by Web 3.0, but apparently i was jumping the gun a bit.) To be honest, i still haven’t found a good tutorial about how one goes about setting up a truly distributed node that is Web 3.0 compliant, but i found a bunch of articles that point to subscription sites where you can easily get going building your unique “Hello World” site, for reasons? Even those are mostly focused on instantiating identity (although those might be semi-disposable, and since there’s payment, i’m not going to use ‘anonymous’ because, yeah, they’re not at that point.)

i have questions and concerns about this proposed system. i mean, aside from the not insignificant concerns about block chains in general, i’m just going to focus on that whole “content” part.

Let’s say you’ve created some bit of media. It could be a book, song, video, picture, or just a short, pithy message, but by God, it’s yours. You initialize a chain tied to yourself and the media and set it loose on the internet, and… well, then what? i’m going to presume that there’s some media amplification site. Some site where folks tend to already congregate and share quality content among themselves. A place where content may be suggested (or blocked) by some controlling entity based on either some set of rules or a set of, say automated processes that automatically highlight content of interest. Maybe you’ll use one or more of those. i’ll note that one of the BIG reasons that sites got away from having APIs is the general headaches they introduce for very little return value.

Ok, so now your precious media is gathering a bit of a following. Yay! So much so that you’re seeing your content duplicated, because the blockchain only protects the concept of ownership, not the content, and the media can be easily extracted using any number of methods, like screenshotting, or setting up an external recording device. Oopsy!

Right, so let’s now say that you’re a very large media company, one which has a VERY strong investment in media generation, management and control. Where Intellectual Property (IP) drives every decision. Obviously, you don’t want to just hand out your money source, so instead what you hand out are licenses that allow customers to consume your IP within the constraints they’ve paid for. For them Web 3.0 is awesome, because now there’s a hard declaration of who crafted the IP, who consumed it, and where it might go beyond that. Now you’ve got a super clear cut case if a content owner duplicates the data out of license, or shares it, or passes it along to unlicensed parties, or anything else you may not like, and you’ve got the legal trail to prove it.

Of course, users might try to bypass your protections in fun ways, so you implement fingerprinting systems to look for partial content and thankfully similar existing systems are flawless works of science that are never ever abused. Nor do studios ever bring charges against customers that are not grounded in hard evidence. i mean, the internet is a copy machine, and this adds a fun machine id code to everything.

So, yeah, that’s just one aspect of Web 3.0 that i started mulling over.

There’s a term i’ve heard recently that i like. Technologists tend to be blinded by Utopia. It fits in well with my theory of the Magnificent Hammer. (You’ve heard “When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail”? Well, if you work in building, designing and selling hammers, suddenly hammers are the perfect tool for EVERYTHING. That’s a Magnificent Hammer.) Being blinded by Utopia means that folks become so enamored with their end goal and the wonders that it will bring that they completely miss the horrors that may accompany it.

Web 3.0 (as it’s defined here) is full of raging horrors and you really don’t have to look super hard to see them. i just picked one at random. i didn’t even get into the whole mess about how this destroys privacy, potentially limits access to just the rich, and all the other woes i can spot.

Just gonna pass on this one.

Hard pass.

Blogs of note
personal Christopher Conlin USMC Henriette's Herbal Blog My Mastodon musings Where have all the good blogs gone?
geek ultramookie

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